Hello, I'm Georgia and wonder is my center! I'm a 20 3/4-year-old university student who likes books, art, science, and other pretty things.

 

Know Your Ingredients: Mace

500sandwiches:

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If all you know of mace is that it is a self defense spray, you’re missing out. Culinary mace, completely unrelated to the tear gas, is actually the lacy outer seed membrane (the botanical term is aril) of the nutmeg seed. The flavor of mace is predictably similar to nutmeg (sweet, sharp – the predominant flavor in “pumpkin pie” spice) though more pungent and with predominate notes of cinnamon, cloves and black pepper. A key reason for using mace over nutmeg is that it imparts a lovely saffron hue to dishes. Mace’s unique biting spiciness tempered with a warming sweetness has made it an interesting addition to desserts and baked goods in both Asian (mace is native to Indonesia) and European cooking traditions. In India, grated mace is added to spiced tea (masala chai), spiced milk (masala paal/ukala) and is sometimes a component in the spice mixture garam masala. Mace also finds its way into various pickles and curries throughout Southeast Asia and is even used to spice up the Scottish national dish, haggis.

When purchasing whole mace (pieces are called blades) look for a bright orange to red color. While grated mace can be added directly to dishes, whole blades of mace are plucked out before serving. An advantage of store-bought grated mace is that it will retain its pungency considerably longer than most ground spices. One teaspoon of ground mace equals approximately 1 tablespoon of mace blades.

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Mace is known as javitri (जावित्री) in Hindi, jathipattiri (சாதிப்பத்திரி) in Tamil, kembang pala in Malay and sekar pala in Indonesian.

donkos:

reading a foreign language: yeah
writing in a foreign language: ok
listening to a foreign language: wait
speaking in a foreign language: fuck

things about Hufflepuffs #298

thingsabouthufflepuffs:

Hufflepuffs get more excited than most for any spectacular celestial event. Any time there’s a meteor shower or lunar eclipse, you can bet most of the Hufflepuff house will make it an all-night party.

creativemornings:

Conflict Kitchen is a take-out restaurant that only serves cuisine from countries with which the United States is in conflict. One of its founders, Robert Sayre, spoke at CreativeMornings/Pittsburgh as part of our month on Rebel.
Check out his talk and learn more about the cause. →

creativemornings:

Conflict Kitchen is a take-out restaurant that only serves cuisine from countries with which the United States is in conflict. One of its founders, Robert Sayre, spoke at CreativeMornings/Pittsburgh as part of our month on Rebel.

Check out his talk and learn more about the cause. →

fencehopping:

Wake skating the eighth wonder of the world.

I was torn between this being really cool and really disrespectful, but it seems from the video that it’s literally this one tiny strip of the terraces that they were allowed to use, so it’s not like they destroyed the entire year’s rice crop in filming this video.

fencehopping:

Wake skating the eighth wonder of the world.

I was torn between this being really cool and really disrespectful, but it seems from the video that it’s literally this one tiny strip of the terraces that they were allowed to use, so it’s not like they destroyed the entire year’s rice crop in filming this video.